Today, Kenya, and Africa, and the world, woke up to the sad news that one of the greatest heroes of Kenya, and a world shining light for the environmental movement, Professor Wangari Muta Maathai, had passed on after a long battle with ovarian cancer. It was sad indeed as the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize succumbed at age 71.

Wangari confronted by askaris in Karura Forest

Wangari confronted by askaris at Karura Forest

Many around in the world know the humble woman who refused to bow. A true believer. A fighter. An icon of courage. She fought for the environment – our forests – against more powerful foes – askaris armed with batons, trigger happy police officers, a myopic

government of fools – and all she had was her trademark leather ankle boots and tree seedlings – and she won. Her legacy lives on. She has inspired many to not bow to any pressure in the quest for sustainable development – development that does not destroy the environment – and she has also inspired many African women. To be strong. To believe in themselves. To be proud of being African women.

In celebrating a life that should have lasted perhaps two decades longer, here a few words of environmental wisdom from the woman who refused to bow.

“I am working to make sure we don’t only protect the environment, we also improve governance.”

“In a few decades, the relationship between the environment, resources and conflict may seem almost as obvious as the connection we see today between human rights, democracy and peace.”

“It is important to nurture any new ideas and initiatives which can make a difference for Africa.”

“It’s a matter of life and death for this country. The Kenyan forests are facing extinction and it is a man-made problem.”

“It’s the little things citizens do. That’s what will make the difference. My little thing is planting trees.”

“There’s a general culture in this country to cut all the trees. It makes me so angry because everyone is cutting and no one is planting.”

“We are very fond of blaming the poor for destroying the environment. But often it is the powerful, including governments, that are responsible.”

“We need to promote development that does not destroy our environment.”

RIP Wangari Maathai
I am a disciple.

The woman who refused to bow – RIP Wangari Maathaihttp://kijanimedia.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/karuraprotest.jpghttp://kijanimedia.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/karuraprotest-150x150.jpg kijanimedia ConservationEnvironment,,,,,,
Today, Kenya, and Africa, and the world, woke up to the sad news that one of the greatest heroes of Kenya, and a world shining light for the environmental movement, Professor Wangari Muta Maathai, had passed on after a long battle with ovarian cancer. It was sad indeed as...
Today, Kenya, and Africa, and the world, woke up to the sad news that one of the greatest heroes of Kenya, and a world shining light for the environmental movement, <a title="Wangari Maathai on Wikipedia" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wangari_Maathai" target="_blank">Professor Wangari Muta Maathai</a>, had passed on after a long battle with ovarian cancer. It was sad indeed as the first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize succumbed at age 71. Many around in the world know <a title="Books by Wangari Maathai" href="http://www.greenbeltmovement.org/w.php?id=56" target="_blank">the humble woman who refused to bow</a>. A true believer. A fighter. An icon of courage. She fought for the environment - our forests - against more powerful foes - <em>askaris</em> armed with batons, trigger happy police officers, a myopic government of fools - and all she had was her trademark leather ankle boots and tree seedlings - and she won. Her legacy lives on. She has inspired many to not bow to any pressure in the quest for sustainable development - development that does not destroy the environment - and she has also inspired many African women. To be strong. To believe in themselves. To be proud of being African women. In celebrating a life that should have lasted perhaps two decades longer, here a few words of environmental wisdom from the woman who refused to bow. <em>"I am working to make sure we don't only protect the environment, we also improve governance."</em> <em>"In a few decades, the relationship between the environment, resources and conflict may seem almost as obvious as the connection we see today between human rights, democracy and peace."</em> <em>"It is important to nurture any new ideas and initiatives which can make a difference for Africa."</em> <em>"It's a matter of life and death for this country. The Kenyan forests are facing extinction and it is a man-made problem."</em> <em>"It's the little things citizens do. That's what will make the difference. My little thing is planting trees."</em> <em>"There's a general culture in this country to cut all the trees. It makes me so angry because everyone is cutting and no one is planting."</em> <em>"We are very fond of blaming the poor for destroying the environment. But often it is the powerful, including governments, that are responsible."</em> <em>"We need to promote development that does not destroy our environment."</em> <strong>RIP Wangari Maathai</strong> I am a disciple.