The launch of an information sharing initiative in Tanzania to combat poaching has put Kenya on the spot over its laxity in arresting suspected poaching kingpins.

Pressure is now piling on Nairobi to arrest Feizal Ali Mohammed, who has been linked with poaching and dealing in ivory.

In June, a combined force of police and Kenya Wildlife Service rangers raided a warehouse in Mombasa and recovered 2,152 kilogrammes of ivory consisting of 228 pieces of uncut and 74 pieces of cut elephant tusks.

Two suspects, Ghalib Sadiq Kara and Abdul Halim Sadik Omar, were arrested and have since been charged in the High Court of Mombasa.

An arrest warrant was later issued for Mr Mohamed, but the suspect referred to by activists as an ivory kingpin remains at large.

In the same month, one of Africa’s last elephants was poisoned to death by poachers in Kenya after years of adapting his behaviour to hide from humans.
This and recovery of ivory in Mombasa exposed a much deeper problem that Kenya is facing in combating poaching and other wildlife crime in general.

Reports in public media suggest that cartels — similar to drug trafficking rings — are behind the poaching problem and that senior politicians and police officers are smack in the middle of these cartels, making it difficult to arrest the ringleaders.

The question is: How can Kenya stop these cartels? How can poaching and ivory trafficking be controlled?

Pressure piles on Kenya to arrest suspected ivory kingpinshttp://kijanimedia.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/3socialmedia.jpghttp://kijanimedia.co.ke/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/3socialmedia-150x150.jpg kijanimedia ElephantPoaching
The launch of an information sharing initiative in Tanzania to combat poaching has put Kenya on the spot over its laxity in arresting suspected poaching kingpins. Pressure is now piling on Nairobi to arrest Feizal Ali Mohammed, who has been linked with poaching and dealing in ivory. In June, a combined...
The launch of an information sharing initiative in Tanzania to combat poaching has put Kenya on the spot over its laxity in arresting suspected poaching kingpins. Pressure is now piling on Nairobi to arrest Feizal Ali Mohammed, who has been linked with poaching and dealing in ivory. In June, a combined force of police and Kenya Wildlife Service rangers raided a warehouse in Mombasa and recovered 2,152 kilogrammes of ivory consisting of 228 pieces of uncut and 74 pieces of cut elephant tusks. Two suspects, Ghalib Sadiq Kara and Abdul Halim Sadik Omar, were arrested and have since been charged in the High Court of Mombasa. An arrest warrant was later issued for Mr Mohamed, but the suspect referred to by activists as an ivory kingpin remains at large. In the same month, one of Africa’s last elephants was poisoned to death by poachers in Kenya after years of adapting his behaviour to hide from humans. This and recovery of ivory in Mombasa exposed a much deeper problem that Kenya is facing in combating poaching and other wildlife crime in general. Reports in public media suggest that cartels — similar to drug trafficking rings — are behind the poaching problem and that senior politicians and police officers are smack in the middle of these cartels, making it difficult to arrest the ringleaders. The question is: How can Kenya stop these cartels? How can poaching and ivory trafficking be controlled?